FFE 1250 - Type I
DE Fiberworks, Inc. - Concrete Fiber Reinforcement
563.340.7065

FFE 1250

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FFE 1250 Steel Fibers are made of low carbon, cold drawn steel wire and have a minimum tensile strength of over 140 ksi. They contain deformations and dimples that run the full length of the fibers and give an incredible mechanical bond to the concrete matrix. FFE 1250 Fibers provide a uniform distribution of reinforcement throughout the concrete that increases the tensile strength, impact resistance, shear strength, and ductility of the concrete. Complies with ASTM C 1116, Type I Steel Fiber-Reinforce Concrete or Shotcrete and ASTM A 820, Type I, cold drawn wire.
FFE 1250FFE 1250
Description

 

FFE-1250

 

FULL LENGTH DEFORMED

 

END STEEL FIBERS

 

Guidelines

 

FFE 1250 Steel Fibers are intended for crack containment reinforcement as outlined in ACI 360-10 3.2.2 and should not be used to replace primary reinforcement (structural or load bearing) as outlined in ACI 318. FFE 1250 Steel Fibers should not be used to decrease the thickness of the concrete or increase the control joint spacing beyond the recommendations of ACI or PCA standard guidelines. We recommend following ACI guidelines for control joint locations and details. The standard dosage rates for FFE 1250 Steel Fibers range from 30 lbs. to 80 lbs. per cubic yard of concrete. Packaging is 55 lb. (25 kg) paper bags. Please consult DE Fiberworks for dosage rates for your application, design information, or more details when using FFE 1250 Steel Fibers.

 

Applications

 

FFE 1250 Steel Fibers may be used in any concrete application that requires increased crack control, improved impact, shatter and abrasion resistance, and improved durability. FFE-1250 Steel Fibers can be used for the following applications:

Slabs-on-Ground

Industrial Floors

Warehouse Floors

 

Product Description

 

FFE 1250 Steel Fibers are made of low carbon, cold drawn steel wire and have a minimum tensile strength of over 140 ksi. They contain deformations and dimples that run the full length of the fibers and give an incredible mechanical bond to the concrete matrix. FFE 1250 Fibers provide a uniform distribution of reinforcement throughout the concrete that increases the tensile strength, impact resistance, shear strength, and ductility of the concrete. Complies with ASTM C 1116, Type I Steel Fiber-Reinforce Concrete or Shotcrete and ASTM A 820, Type I, cold drawn wire.

 

Technical Information

 

Steel Fibers (low carbon, drawn wire)
Fiber Length 1.5” (38 mm) or 2.0” (50 mm)
Tensile Strength minimum 140 ksi
Ave. Equivalent Dia. 1.18 mm
Average Aspect Ratio 30 - 35 (1.5”), 42 - 47 (2.0”)
Specific Gravity 7.85
Melting Point 2,760oF
Packaging 55 LB Paper Bags

 

Advantages:

 

Recycling Scrap Yards

Composite Metal Deck Slabs

Parking Areas

Equipment Foundations

Shotcrete

Excellent Crack Control

Increases energy absorption

and toughness of concrete

Safe & Easier than WWF or rebar

Saves Time and Hassle

Cost Effective

Uniform Reinforcement

Requires no minimum cover

Always Positioned Correctly

 

 

FFE-1250

 

FULL LENGTH DEFORMED END STEEL FIBERS

 

Mixing, Placing & Finishing

 

Mixing FFE 1250 steel fibers are packaged in pre-measured heavy-weight paper bags designed to be open and steel fiber introduced into the concrete mix during or after batching other concrete materials. Care should be taken to make sure the fibers are not added to the tail end of a high slump mix. Mixing should conform to ASTM C 94 with a minimum of 75 revolutions of the drum at full mixing speed to ensure uniform distribution of the fibers.

Placing – FFE 1250 steel fibers can be pumped and placed using conventional equipment. Hand screeds can be used, but vibratory and laser screeds are recommended to minimize any surface fibers. At higher dosage rate of fibers, the use of a mid-range or high-range water reducer should be considered.

Finishing - Standard finishing equipment and techniques can be used when working with FFE 1250 steel fibers. Finishing operations should begin as outlined in ACI 302. Troweling blades should be kept flat for as long as possible to ensure a fiber free surface.

 

 

Reinforcement Objective

 

Provide excellent crack-containment, impact and abrasion resistance. Enhance concrete durability and tensile strength.

Provide increased level of residual strength and flexural toughness. Alternate to WWF and rebar for shrinkage & temperature reinforcement.

 

References

 

ASTM C 94 Standard Specification for Ready-Mixed Concrete Uniformity Requirements

ASTM C 1399 Average Residual Strength of Fiber Reinforced Concrete

ASTM C 1436 Standard Specification for Materials for Shotcrete

ASTM C 1609 Standard Test Method for Flexural Performance of Fiber Reinforced Concrete

ASTM C 1116 Standard Specification for Fiber-Reinforced Concrete and Shotcrete

ASTM A 820 Standard Specification for Steel Fibers for Fiber- Reinforced Concrete

ACI 302 Guide for Concrete Floor And Slab Construction

ACI 360R-10 Guide to Design of Slabs-on-Ground

ACI 506 Guide for Shotcrete

ACI 544 Guide for Specifying, Proportioning, Mixing, Placing, and Finishing Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete

 

Safety

 

DE Fiberworks recommends that gloves and eye protection be used when handling or adding FFE 1250 Steel Fibers to concrete.

 

 

Dave Edmundson, P.E.

 

dave@defiberworks.com

 

563-340-7065

Warranty and Limitation of Liability

This publication should not be construed as engineering advice. While the information is accurate to the best of our knowledge, DE Fiberworks does not warranty its accuracy or completeness. Product sold herein is of merchantable quality to seller’s standards and specifications. Seller’s warranty is limited to manufacturer’s product warranty and the recommended application and fitness for a particular purpose. In no event shall

DE Fiberworks be liable for any special, incidental, consequential, or exemplary damages.

 
 
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Did You Know?

In the U.S., synthetic and steel fibers have been used in concrete for over 30 years to improve concrete’s plastic (early-age) and hardened properties. 

 

In the U.S., synthetic and steel fibers have been used in concrete for over 30 years to improve concrete’s plastic (early-age) and hardened properties.  Micro-synthetic fibers have been used to provide control of random plastic-shrinkage cracking.  Steel fiber and Macro-synthetic fibers have been used to provide crack width control in concrete after it reaches a hardened state.  Combining these products (Blends) provides plastic and hardened state benefits.  The concrete applications that fiber reinforcement is used and includes, but not limited to, slabs-on-grade, composite metal deck slabs, topping slabs over precast panels, precast, and shotcrete.